On Renewal: Hybrid Pedagogy’s 2020 List of Lists

New years prompt us to reflect. For Hybrid Pedagogy, 2020 brought changes, additions, and new provocations.

On Renewal: Hybrid Pedagogy’s 2020 List of Lists

After the constant upheaval 2020 has brought, after the barrage of novelty and adjustment we’ve endured this year, there is a bit of calm to be found in familiarity, by enjoying the comfort of the routine. In that spirit, Hybrid Pedagogy returns to a tradition we last observed in 2016: our (aspirationally) annual List of Lists. These articles — initially meant to throw shade on the “listicles” made popular by Buzzfeed and the like — review past work and reorient us for what’s ahead. With 2020’s frustrations fading into the past, we turn with optimism to our future. This year, we have just as much to anticipate as we do to remember.

List of New Reviewers

2020 brought a few changes to this journal, from a simplified design and a renewed focus on care in the work of teaching to a team of new reviewers who act as the eyes, ears, and heart of the journal. Their names will appear more frequently as new articles debut in the coming months.

  • Bethany Thomas
  • Brandon Morgan
  • Cate Denial
  • Felecia Caton-Garcia
  • Jakob Gowell
  • Karen Cangialosi
  • Laura Gibbs

List of Our New Reviewers’ Favorite Articles

We asked our new reviewers to share their favorite article from our collection, and the themes of resistance, protest, and care showed in their responses, serving as a reminder of what has become important during this challenging year.

List of New and Forthcoming Books from Hybrid Pedagogy Publishing

While bringing together a new cohort of reviewers, we’ve also been working on new book projects that the journal will publish soon. These new titles expand the range of voices published by Hybrid Pedagogy Publishing and bring both new content and renewed attention to existing work. Keep an eye out for the announcement of their publication!

  • An Urgency of Teachers by Sean Michael Morris and Jesse Stommel
  • Critical Digital Pedagogy: A Collection edited by Jesse Stommel, Chris Friend, and Sean Michael Morris
  • Hybrid Teaching: Pedagogy, People, Politics edited by Chris Friend (Coming January 2021)
  • Voices of Practice — Narrative Scholarship from the Margins edited by Sean Michael Morris, Lucy Rai, and Karen Littleton (Coming March 2021)

Our next release, Hybrid Teaching: Pedagogy, People, Politics, combines selections from the Hybrid Pedagogy archives with chapters from across the globe and across the education system. Continuing the work of Critical Digital Pedagogy: A Collection, Hybrid Teaching focuses on the political nature of teaching. Its chapters explore the human element of education and the political consequences of decisions regarding educational technology. The book works to challenge and unsettle our understanding of how politics shapes education — and how the reverse needs to also be true.

Hybrid Teaching includes an anthology of selections from this journal, as well as works new to Hybrid Pedagogy from Maha Bali, Martha Burtis, Chris Gilliard, Asao B. Inoue, Sean Michael Morris, and Audrey Watters. The book will be available in print-on-demand, ebook, and pay-what-you-will PDF versions. New content from the book — including original material from Robin DeRosa, Chris Friend, and Amanda Licastro — will also appear here on Hybrid Pedagogy in the weeks following the collection's release.

List of the Most-Read Articles in 2020

As educators have worked to re-think their approaches to pedagogy and face the challenges of mediated learning at a distance, Hybrid Pedagogy readers have looked to articles that highlight the central concerns of critical digital pedagogy: centering the work of teaching in the human concerns of connection.

List of the Most-Read Articles from 2020

Just as our readers have looked back to central texts helping to define our relationship with distance learning, the most-read articles published this year show the issues our readers and contributors agree are pressing, urgent concerns: resistance, subversion, and care.

And finally, for the sake of completion and absurdity, let’s end with a review — somewhat of a tribute to retrospectives — of Hybrid Pedagogy’s remembered tradition.

List of our Lists of Lists