Publishing
29 articles
Love in the Time of Peer Review
Collaboration
Marisol Brito · Alexander Fink · Chris Friend · Adam Heidebrink-Bruno · Rolin Moe · Kris Shaffer · Valerie Robin · Robin Wharton
Over the weekend of November 21-23, the Hybrid Pedagogy editorial board gathered in Washington D.C. for an intensive working retreat. During that time, we collaborated on the following article — 10 authors
Maggie's Digital Content Farm
Digital Writing
Audrey Watters
This piece was contributed as part of Hybrid Pedagogy‘s Digital Writing Month. Over the course of the last 6 months or so, I’ve felt a real shift in what it
Generative Literature Project Update #1
Publishing
Michelle Kassorla
The murder of Theopolis College president Cadence Mackarthur has not yet happened. It’s Fall, and the college hasn’t yet made public their choice of ten “Distinguished Centennial Alumni”; indeed,
Humanists and Our Books, Pt. 2: Becoming Books
Digital culture
Robin Wharton
On Tuesday, June 3, Hybrid Pedagogy released an announcement and CFP related to the first long-form project to be undertaken by Hybrid Pedagogy Publishing. Two weeks later, we launched a crowdfunding campaign on
Humanists and Our Books, Pt. 1: The Work of Humanism
Digital culture
Robin Wharton
On Tuesday, June 3, Hybrid Pedagogy released an announcement and CFP related to the first long-form project to be undertaken by Hybrid Pedagogy Publishing. In the coming weeks, look for another announcement regarding
The Critical Textbook
Higher Ed
Kris Shaffer
Nothing enshrines an idea quite like printing it in a textbook. In fact, the textbook is the ultimate canon: a fixed tome of knowledge, shared across institutional boundaries, with the authority to dictate
Hybrid Pedagogy, Digital Humanities, and the Future of Academic Publishing
Digital Humanities
Sean Michael Morris · Jesse Stommel
It is not enough to write monographs. It is not enough to publish. Today, scholars must understand what happens when our research is distributed, and we must write, not for rarified audiences, but
Collaborative Peer Review: Gathering the Academy’s Orphans
Publishing
Sean Michael Morris
“…revolutionary leaders cannot be falsely generous, nor can they manipulate. Whereas the oppressor elites flourish by trampling the people underfoot, the revolutionary leaders can flourish only in communion with the people.” ~ Paulo
Editorial Pedagogy, pt. 3: Developing Editors and Designers
Digital Literacy
Cheryl E. Ball
This is the third installment in a three-part series on Editorial Pedagogy, a critical and three-dimensional approach to teaching, editing, and service. The first installment introduces the practice from a theoretical framework; the
Editorial Pedagogy, pt. 2: Developing Authors
Publishing
Cheryl E. Ball
In the previous installment to this series, I wrote about the theoretical foundations on which my professional philosophy, an editorial pedagogy, is built on the recursive and reciprocal relationships between my editorial praxis
Editorial Pedagogy, pt. 1: A Professional Philosophy
Digital Literacies
Cheryl E. Ball
This article is the first in a three-part series. Two subsequent articles by Cheryl Ball will demonstrate the application of editorial pedagogy to the relationships between students / teachers and authors / editors respectively. Sometimes,
The Four Noble Virtues of Digital Media Citation
Publishing
Jesse Stommel · Pete Rorabaugh
In digital space, everything we do is networked. Real thinking doesn’t (and can’t) happen in a vacuum. Our teaching practices and scholarship don’t just burst forth miraculously from our skulls.
Pedagogy as Publishing
Publishing
Charlotte Frost
Publishing and teaching can both terrify new academics, often to the point of paralysis. Their mutual support for one another is often frustrated by institutional demands. For example, the traditional workload split for
Experiments in Mass Collaboration
Assessment
Jesse Stommel · Pete Rorabaugh
One of the most innovative educational ideas of the last century, we propose, came from Paulo Friere, the Brazilian educational theorist and populist. In his critique of “the banking model of education” in
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