Digital Pedagogy
92 articles
The Rules of Twitter
Digital culture
Dorothy Kim
Twitter is an incredibly dynamic digital tool that can create spaces of flattened hierarchies. These spaces can fuel inclusive pedagogy. But before teaching with Twitter, instructors have to think about how to use
Love in the Time of Peer Review
Collaboration
Marisol Brito · Alexander Fink · Chris Friend · Adam Heidebrink-Bruno · Rolin Moe · Kris Shaffer · Valerie Robin · Robin Wharton
Over the weekend of November 21-23, the Hybrid Pedagogy editorial board gathered in Washington D.C. for an intensive working retreat. During that time, we collaborated on the following article — 10 authors
If Freire Made a MOOC: Open Education as Resistance
critical digital pedagogy
Sean Michael Morris · Jesse Stommel
MOOCs and Critical Pedagogy are not obvious bedfellows. The hype around MOOCs has centered mostly on a brand of sage on the stage courseware at direct odds with Critical Pedagogy’s emphasis on learner agency.
A Misapplication of MOOCs: Critical Pedagogy Writ Massive
critical digital pedagogy
Sean Michael Morris
I am peeking through a pinhole when I look at MOOCs. Like any tool in the wrong hands, MOOCs can become agents of continued oppression — of the learner or the teacher, in a pedagogical sense or in a poli-economic one.
Trust, Agency, and Connected Learning
Critical Pedagogy
Jesse Stommel
This interview with Jesse was published on HASTAC as part of the Digital Media and Learning Competition 5 Trust Challenge. We are republishing a revised version here on Hybrid Pedagogy’s Page Two
Designing Critically: Feminist Pedagogy for Digital / Real Life
Critical Digital Pedagogy CFP
Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés · Aimee deNoyelles
This article is a response submitted for our series about critical digital pedagogy. See the original CFP for details. I’m a feminist teacher of writing and literature of over 25 years and,
Risk, Reward, and Digital Writing
Digital culture
Sean Michael Morris
Autocorrect is tyranny. It is interruption of thought, of speech, of creation, a condition for — and sometimes a prohibition against — my voice being heard. When I type “phone-less” and autocorrect changes
Synchronous and Asynchronous Technologies: When Real Worlds Collide
Digital Pedagogy
Glen Cochrane
Many of us are drawn in by the allure of digital technology, tempting us to structure our daily personal and work routines increasingly on asynchronous communication. Making choices to act asynchronously, often by
Introducing Digital Humanities Work to Undergraduates: An Overview
Digital culture
Adeline Koh
You are already a digital humanist, whether or not you know it. Digital humanities has exploded in popularity over the last decade, as evidenced by the creation of many different types of grants
Three Lines of Resistance: Ethics, Critical Pedagogy, and Teaching Underground
Critical Digital Pedagogy CFP
Kris Shaffer
This article is a response submitted for our series about critical digital pedagogy. See the original CFP for details. It is easy for those of us invested in critical pedagogy to see need
A Pedagogy of Discovery: Reflections on Teaching Tech to Elementary Students
Critical Pedagogy
Adam Heidebrink-Bruno
When I discovered a rather nondescript blurb on Craigslist about needing an immediate replacement for a “technology specialist,” I didn’t know exactly what I’d find. Much to my joy, however, I
Making change: Produsing hybrid learning products
Digital Pedagogy
Lina Rahm · Jörgen Skågeby
Design Pattern Name: Hybrid learning products Problem Statement: Digital humanities students are too often subjected to an over-emphasis of critical reflection and not enough experiential learning and corresponding presentation formats. This results in
Technology 101: What Do We Need To Know About The Future We're Creating?
Digital culture
Howard Rheingold
Howard Rheingold brought this piece to our attention after Jesse and Sean published “Is it Okay to Be a Luddite” on Instructure’s Keep Learning blog. Originally published in 1998 as the start
Is It Okay to Be a Luddite?
Digital culture
Sean Michael Morris · Jesse Stommel
This piece was originally published on Instructure’s Keep Learning blog. When it posted, we received a message from Howard Rheingold (NetSmart) linking us to a post last revised in May 1998. In
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